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Flooring Trade Supplies





flooring trade supplies






    flooring
  • building material used in laying floors

  • (floored) provided with a floor

  • The boards or other material of which a floor is made

  • floor: the inside lower horizontal surface (as of a room, hallway, tent, or other structure); "they needed rugs to cover the bare floors"; "we spread our sleeping bags on the dry floor of the tent"





    supplies
  • Be a source of (something needed)

  • (supply) offering goods and services for sale

  • Make (something needed or wanted) available to someone; provide

  • (supply) give something useful or necessary to; "We provided the room with an electrical heater"

  • Provide (someone) with something needed or wanted

  • (supply) an amount of something available for use





    trade
  • Buy and sell goods and services

  • (esp. of shares or currency) Be bought and sold at a specified price

  • the commercial exchange (buying and selling on domestic or international markets) of goods and services; "Venice was an important center of trade with the East"; "they are accused of conspiring to constrain trade"

  • Buy or sell (a particular item or product)

  • engage in the trade of; "he is merchandising telephone sets"

  • the skilled practice of a practical occupation; "he learned his trade as an apprentice"











flooring trade supplies - Econoclasts: The




Econoclasts: The Rebels Who Sparked the Supply-Side Revolution and Restored American Prosperity


Econoclasts: The Rebels Who Sparked the Supply-Side Revolution and Restored American Prosperity



Ever since America descended into economic crisis the comparisons to the Great Depression have come fast and furious. Incredibly, we have heard almost nothing about a much more recent economic calamity: the ruinous "stagflation" of the 1970s—the second-worst decade in American economic history. But now, in the riveting, groundbreaking book Econoclasts, historian Brian Domitrovic reminds us that the twentieth century’s greatest economic counterrevolution emerged in response to that crisis: supply-side economics.

In a pulsing narrative, Domitrovic tells the remarkable story of the economists, journalists, Washington staffers, and (ultimately) politicians who showed America how to get out of the 1970s funk and ushered in an unprecedented quarter-century run of growth and opportunity. Here we meet Robert Mundell, the brilliant economist who held court over martinis in a Manhattan steakhouse; his gregarious cohort Arthur Laffer, chief economist on the president’s budget staff at the tender age of thirty; Robert Bartley, the Wall Street Journal’s reticent editorial-page editor who became the first impresario of supply-side economics; Jack Kemp, the football-star-turned-congressman who led the fight to turn supply-side theory into practice; Norman Ture, the relentless economic forecaster who faced down Alan Greenspan; Jude Wanniski, the eccentric, hot rod-driving reporter whose best-selling book touched off the supply-side revolution; and a host of other fascinating figures who helped upend the economic establishment.

Based on the author’s years of archival research, Econoclasts explodes numerous myths about supply-side economics, including its "creation myth"—the famous incident in which Laffer sketched a simple curve on a napkin. Domitrovic conclusively demonstrates that supply-side advocates did not invent a doctrine out of whole cloth. Their central insight was that the two massive means of governmental intrusion in the economy—the income tax and the Federal Reserve—play the primary role in starting and perpetuating any economic crisis. What’s more, Domitrovic shows that the specific combination of tax cuts and stable money had an unbroken record of success long before it went by the name "supply-side economics": in 1962, when JFK ended the economic sluggishness that had brought three recessions in Eisenhower’s eight-year presidency; in 1947, when the United States embarked on the postwar boom; and in 1922, when Treasury Secretary Andrew Mellon inaugurated the Roaring ’20s by imploring the Fed to keep the price level stable and arranging for Congress to slash income-tax rates.

Econoclasts is a masterful narrative history in the tradition of Amity Shlaes’s The Forgotten Man and John Steele Gordon’s An Empire of Wealth. It is also impeccably timely: this is a story we must know if we are to understand the foundations of America’s prosperity—foundations that are now under increasing attack.

"Couldn't be more timely."
— Amity Shlaes, bestselling author of The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression

"A brilliant look at America's last economic crisis. This is the book Americans need to read now."
— Larry Kudlow, host of CNBC's The Kudlow Report

“I’ve never read anything on the subject of economics that surpasses this extraor¬dinary book for its lucidity, richness, depth, intelligibility, savvy, and sheer intellectual excitement. Its publication could hardly come at a better time, as the fatal attraction of statism seems to have reemerged, one more time, from the murky depths to which it had been consigned.”
— Wilfred McClay, award-winning historian, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Ever since America descended into economic crisis the comparisons to the Great Depression have come fast and furious. Incredibly, we have heard almost nothing about a much more recent economic calamity: the ruinous "stagflation" of the 1970s—the second-worst decade in American economic history. But now, in the riveting, groundbreaking book Econoclasts, historian Brian Domitrovic reminds us that the twentieth century’s greatest economic counterrevolution emerged in response to that crisis: supply-side economics.

In a pulsing narrative, Domitrovic tells the remarkable story of the economists, journalists, Washington staffers, and (ultimately) politicians who showed America how to get out of the 1970s funk and ushered in an unprecedented quarter-century run of growth and opportunity. Here we meet Robert Mundell, the brilliant economist who held court over martinis in a Manhattan steakhouse; his gregarious cohort Arthur Laffer, chief economist on the president’s budget staff at the tender age of thirty; Robert Bartley, the Wall Street Journal’s reticent editorial-page editor who became the first impresario of supply-side economics; Jack Kemp, the football-star-turned-congressman who led the fight to turn supply-side theory into practice; Norman Ture, the relentless economic forecaster who faced down Alan Greenspan; Jude Wanniski, the eccentric, hot rod-driving reporter whose best-selling book touched off the supply-side revolution; and a host of other fascinating figures who helped upend the economic establishment.

Based on the author’s years of archival research, Econoclasts explodes numerous myths about supply-side economics, including its "creation myth"—the famous incident in which Laffer sketched a simple curve on a napkin. Domitrovic conclusively demonstrates that supply-side advocates did not invent a doctrine out of whole cloth. Their central insight was that the two massive means of governmental intrusion in the economy—the income tax and the Federal Reserve—play the primary role in starting and perpetuating any economic crisis. What’s more, Domitrovic shows that the specific combination of tax cuts and stable money had an unbroken record of success long before it went by the name "supply-side economics": in 1962, when JFK ended the economic sluggishness that had brought three recessions in Eisenhower’s eight-year presidency; in 1947, when the United States embarked on the postwar boom; and in 1922, when Treasury Secretary Andrew Mellon inaugurated the Roaring ’20s by imploring the Fed to keep the price level stable and arranging for Congress to slash income-tax rates.

Econoclasts is a masterful narrative history in the tradition of Amity Shlaes’s The Forgotten Man and John Steele Gordon’s An Empire of Wealth. It is also impeccably timely: this is a story we must know if we are to understand the foundations of America’s prosperity—foundations that are now under increasing attack.

"Couldn't be more timely."
— Amity Shlaes, bestselling author of The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression

"A brilliant look at America's last economic crisis. This is the book Americans need to read now."
— Larry Kudlow, host of CNBC's The Kudlow Report

“I’ve never read anything on the subject of economics that surpasses this extraor¬dinary book for its lucidity, richness, depth, intelligibility, savvy, and sheer intellectual excitement. Its publication could hardly come at a better time, as the fatal attraction of statism seems to have reemerged, one more time, from the murky depths to which it had been consigned.”
— Wilfred McClay, award-winning historian, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga










75% (19)





Newly Built 7 WTC




Newly Built 7 WTC





There have been two buildings in New York City named 7 World Trade Center. The first building, which opened in 1987, was destroyed on September 11, 2001. The newer building was completed in 2006 and it is the first with a World Trade Center address to have been rebuilt.

Construction of the new 7 World Trade Center began in 2002, and was completed in 2006 at a cost of $700 million.[12] The 52-story building is is 750 feet (228 m) tall, and contains 1,700,000 square feet (158 000 m?) of leasable office space starting from the 11th floor.[13] The first ten floors will house an electrical substation which will power most of Lower Manhattan. The office tower has a narrower footprint at ground level than its predecessor (as the course of Greenwich Street has been restored in an effort to re-unite Tribeca and the Financial District).

The architect was David Childs of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill who worked in conjunction with glass artist and designer James Carpenter. They used ultra-clear, low-iron glass to provide reflectivity and light, with stainless-steel spandrels behind the glass that also help reflect sunlight.[12] Artist Jenny Holzer created a large light installation inside the main lobby with glowing text moving across wide plastic panels.[12] The entire wall is about 30 meters wide by 7 meters tall and changes colors, according to the time of day.

The building has 2 foot (60 cm) thick reinforced concrete and fireproofed elevator and stairway access shafts, whereas the original building used only drywall to line these shafts. The stairways are wider than in the original building to permit greater egress. Steel columns are encased in much thicker fire protection and the building is being promoted as the safest skyscraper in the U.S.[14] According to Silverstein Properties, the owner of the building, it "will incorporate a host of life-safety enhancements that will become the prototype for new high-rise construction..."

7 World Trade Center is equipped with destination elevators, supplied by the Otis Elevator Company.[15] After entering their floor destination in a lobby keypad, people are grouped together and directed to specific elevators that will stop at their particular floor. There are no buttons to press inside the elevators. This system is designed to reduce waiting and travel times on the elevators.

The building is considered New York City's first "green" office tower by gaining gold status in the US Green Building Council's LEED program.[16] Rainwater is collected and used for irrigation of the park, and to cool the building, and recycled steel was used in the building's construction.[12]

The triangular park was created by David Childs with Ken Smith and his colleague Annie Weinmayr of Ken Smith Landscape Architect, and is situated between the now extended Greenwich Street and West Broadway. It consists of a central open plaza with a fountain and flanking groves of trees and shrubs. As the seasons change, so will the colors in the park, providing a soothing natural complement to the adjacent tower. Artist Jeff Koons created Balloon Flower (Red), the sculpture in the center of the fountain. The mirror-polished stainless steel sculpture represents a twisted balloon in the shape of a flower that has been enlarged to monumental scale.

Building Seven was not included in the original World Trade Center master plan by Daniel Libeskind, but was designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill under the leadership of David Childs, who largely redesigned the Freedom Tower.

The building was officially opened at noon on May 23, 2006 with a free concert sponsored by Larry Silverstein. The concert featured Suzanne Vega, Citizen Cope, Bill Ware Vibes, Brazilian Girls, Ollabelle, Pharaoh's Daughter, Ronan Tynan of the Irish Tenors, and special guest Lou Reed.

From September 8 to October 7, 2006, the work of photographer Jonathan Hyman was on exhibit in 7 World Trade Center, on the 45th floor.[17] The exhibit, "An American Landscape", was hosted by the World Trade Center Memorial Foundation. The photographs captured the response of people in New York City and across the United States following the September 11, 2001 attacks. At the time of the exhibit, the 45th floor was a large, empty concrete space, which will eventually be turned into offices. From the 45th floor, visitors could also see 360 degree views of Lower Manhattan, Midtown Manhattan, the Hudson River, Brooklyn Bridge, and a view of the World Trade Center site

*Wikipedia











A view looking SouthEast




A view looking SouthEast





from the 40th floor of 190 S. LaSalle

The Chicago Board of Trade
Commissioned in 1925 to architects Holabird & Root, the building was constructed by general contractors Hegeman & Harris for $12 millon. Clad in gray Indiana limestone, topped with a copper pyramid roof, and standing on a footprint running 174 feet east and west on Jackson Boulevard and 240 feet north and south on LaSalle Street, the 605-foot tall art-deco styled building opened on June 9 1930. It serves as the southern border for the skyscrapers hugging LaSalle Street and remains taller than surrounding structures for several blocks. The Chicago Board of Trade has operated continuously at its twelfth location since the opening, initially occupying 70,000 of an available 600,000 square feet of floorspace,[11] and dedicating 19,000 square feet to the world's largest trading floor.[12] The advent of steel frame structural systems provided the ability for completely vertical construction, but as with many skyscrapers of the era, the exterior was designed with multiple setbacks at increasing heights, which served to allow additional light into the ever increasing concrete valleys in urban cores. At night, the setbacks are upwardly lit by floodlights, further highlighting the structure's vertical elements. Interior decoration includes polished surfaces throughout, use of black and white marble, prominent vertical hallway trim, and an open three-story lobby which at the time of opening housed the world's largest light fixture. Though One LaSalle Street had five more floors, the CBOT building was the first in Chicago to exceed a height of 600 feet. After surpassing the Chicago Temple Building, it was the tallest in Chicago until the Richard J. Daley Center was completed in 1965. It remains the tallest art-deco building outside of Manhattan. Known for their work on the Brooklyn Bridge, the family-operated factory of John A. Roebling supplied much of the 20 miles of wire rope used in the building and all of the cables used in the building's 23 Otis elevators.[13]









flooring trade supplies







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